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Vol 2 No 1 (2018): June 2018

Journal of Applied Studies in Language (JASL)

Published: 2018-06-11

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Title: Compact, concise, clear, not more than 15 words long, 16pts

I.N.S.Sanjaya1                                                                                                                                                                                           

Politeknik Negeri Bali (Affiliation)

Gede Ginaya                                                                                                                                                                                       

Email:gdginaya@pnb.ac.id                                                                                                                                                                                               

Politeknik Negeri Bali

Abstract – The abstract of the article should be well-written and include at least the following five essential things to enable the reader to grasp what the study is about: (a) purpose – describe briefly what the aim(s) of the study is (are); (b) data source(s) – mention the source(s) from which the data was (were) drawn. Include the N of the participants or samples and their characteristics (e.g. “A total of 200 intermediate-level learners of English (mean age = 21.5) agreed to participate in the study”; (c) the method used for collecting data – mention the instrument used and procedure followed in collecting the data; (d) the general results or findings of the study; and (e) general interpretations and/or applications of the results. The abstract should not exceed 300 words.

Keywords: include between three and five keywords

1.  Introduction

The Introduction should act as the brains of the study. It should minimally contain (a) the topic being investigated, (b) the significance of the study, (c) the research question(s), (d) any theory being considered, and (e) any hypothesis being proposed. In the introduction, the author should also operationally define constructs and terminology employed throughout the study.                                                                                                                                       

The Introduction should provide relevant historical context and bring in any theory considered relevant to the issue being raised in the study. To this end, the author should summarize and reference a number of past studies and/or opinions to lead the reader to the study being reported on in the article. The Introduction should not exceed 15% of the total length of the entire article.

2.  Method

The Method section of a research article should constitute the skeleton of the study. It should describe in great details what/who was studied and how the data was obtained and analyzed. As such, it should consist of the following information:

The Method section of a research article should constitute the skeleton of the study. It should describe in great details what/ who was studied and how the data was obtained and analyzed. As such, it should consist of the following information:

(2.1   Research design)

(Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method?

         Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method? Did the study employ quantitative, qualitative, or mixed method?)

(2.2   Participants)

(Where was the data obtained from, how many of them, and what are the characteristics of the participants/samples, e.g. age, socioeconomic status, length of English study, place of work or study (mentioned in a vague way). Please note that the author should not disclose the real identity of the participants, such as names (use pseudonym instead), name of the organization or school where the participants work or study).

(2.3   Data Collection)

This subsection should describe the instrument(s) used to collect the data and the procedure followed in the collection of the data

(2.4   Data Analysis)

(If the study adopted a quantitative method, mention what statistic was used to analyze the data, preferably with the reasoning behind using such statistic. Any coding involved in the data analysis process should also clearly be described. The method section of the article should not exceed 30% of the total length of the entire article.

         If the study adopted a quantitative method, mention what statistic was used to analyze the data, preferably with the reasoning behind using such statistic. Any coding involved in the data analysis process should also clearly be described. The method section of the article should not exceed 30% of the total length of the entire article.)

3.  Results and Discussion

Research article reporting on a quantitative study should present the results of both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. In a qualitative study, the author should present verbal data consisting of detailed description of his or her observation. Each table or graph presented in this section should be accompanied by a short, clear description, and hence no table or graph should be presented to speak for itself. No interpretation of the presented data should be offered in this section. This section should not exceed 20% of the total length of the entire article.

         Research article reporting on a quantitative study should present the results of both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. In a qualitative study, the author should present verbal data consisting of detailed description of his or her observation. Each table or graph presented in this section should be accompanied by a short, clear description, and hence no table or graph should be presented to speak for itself. No interpretation of the presented data should be offered in this section. This section should not exceed 20% of the total length of the entire article.

         Research article reporting on a quantitative study should present the results of both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. In a qualitative study, the author should present verbal data consisting of detailed description of his or her observation. Each table or graph presented in this section should be accompanied by a short, clear description, and hence no table or graph should be presented to speak for itself. No interpretation of the presented data should be offered in this section. This section should not exceed 20% of the total length of the entire article. The manuscript of the reseach has to be guaranted of beeing free from plagiarim. The easiest way to check the manuscript of a research is by checking it using free plagiarism checker application (see Wajdi, Sumartana, and Hudiananingsih, 2018).

         Research article reporting on a quantitative study should present the results of both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses. In a qualitative study, the author should present verbal data consisting of detailed description of his or her observation. Each table or graph presented in this section should be accompanied by a short, clear description, and hence no table or graph should be presented to speak for itself. No interpretation of the presented data should be offered in this section. This section should not exceed 20% of the total length of the entire article.

4.  Conclusion

The major finding(s) of the studies should be restated briefly in the Concluding section. In it, the author should also point out the strength(s) and weakness(es) of his or her study, and subsequently suggest improvement for future studies. Last, but not least, the practical application or implication of the findings of the study should also be clearly stated in the Concluding section. This section should not exceed 10% of the total length of the entire article.

            The major finding(s) of the studies should be restated briefly in the Concluding section. In it, the author should also point out the strength(s) and weakness(es) of his or her study, and subsequently suggest improvement for future studies. Last, but not least, the practical application or implication of the findings of the study should also be clearly stated in the Concluding section. This section should not exceed 10% of the total length of the entire article.

References

Journal:

Alcón Soler, E. (2015). Instruction and pragmatic change during study abroad email communication. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 9(1), 34–45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17501229.2014.995763

Alcón Soler, E. (2015). Instruction and pragmatic change during study abroad email communication. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 9(1), 34–45. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17501229.2014.995763

Wajdi, M, Sumartana, I M., & Hudiananingsih, N P. D. (2018). Avoiding Plagiarism in Writing a Research Paper. Soshum: Jurnal Sosial Dan Humaniora, 8(1), 94-102. Retrieved from <http://ojs.pnb.ac.id/index.php/SOSHUM/article/view/769>. Date accessed: 25 July 2018.  DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.31940/soshum.v8i1.769

Book:

Bachman, L., & Palmer, A. (2010). Language assessment in practice. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Hyland, K. (2014). Dialogue, community and persuasion in research writing. In L. Gil-Salom & C. Soler-Monreal (Eds.), Dialogicity in written specialised genres (pp. 1-20). Amsterdam/Philadelphia: John Benjamins.